Measurement Tools for Improving the Performance, Efficiency, and Security of Wireless Communication Systems

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Aaron Schulman

Aaron Schulman
University of California, San Diego
Monday, November 5, 2018 @ 11:00am
Room 1202, CSE Building

Measurement Tools for Improving the Performance, Efficiency, and Security of Wireless Communication Systems

Abstract:
Wireless communication is pervasive: nearly all of our modern electronic devices include at least one radio. At this scale, we can longer assume that the operation of wireless devices follows strictly from the intentions of the protocol designers. Rather, the parameters set by providers, the implementations created by vendors, and the activities performed by users govern the behavior of wireless communication.  Unfortunately, existing low-level wireless measurement tools do not have the ability to observe how these elements affect the performance, efficiency, and security of wireless communication.
 
In this talk, I will describe three measurement tools that my research group created to observe and improve wireless communication systems: "Secrets in Scheduling", "Sweeping the Spectrum", and "Sleuthing for Skimmers". I will discuss the insights that led to the development of these tools, and the impact of their initial deployments, including: the discovery that every US LTE provider is inadvertently throttling streaming video, the observation that cellular spectrum is inefficiently allocated, and the detection of cyber criminals in San Diego that are using Bluetooth to steal payment card information at gas stations.
 
Bio:

Aaron Schulman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, San Diego. He builds measurement tools to gain new insight into the behavior of mobile and embedded devices. Schulman's tools have been deployed in industry, law enforcement, and academia to observe and improve their systems. He earned his PhD in Computer Science from University of Maryland and was a postdoc at Stanford. His dissertation was selected to receive the SIGCOMM Doctoral Dissertation Award.